15. e-Learning to Build Thinking Skills

  1. Ruth Colvin Clark and
  2. Richard E. Mayer

Published Online: 4 JAN 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781118255971.ch15

e-Learning and the Science of Instruction: Proven Guidelines for Consumers and Designers of Multimedia Learning, Third Edition

e-Learning and the Science of Instruction: Proven Guidelines for Consumers and Designers of Multimedia Learning, Third Edition

How to Cite

Clark, R. C. and Mayer, R. E. (2011) e-Learning to Build Thinking Skills, in e-Learning and the Science of Instruction: Proven Guidelines for Consumers and Designers of Multimedia Learning, Third Edition, Pfeiffer, San Francisco, CA, USA. doi: 10.1002/9781118255971.ch15

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 4 JAN 2012
  2. Published Print: 1 AUG 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470874301

Online ISBN: 9781118255971

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Keywords:

  • cognitive task analysis;
  • critical thinking;
  • job-specific thinking;
  • metacognitive skills;
  • multimedia learning environments;
  • thinking skills;
  • whole-task course

Summary

This chapter discusses domain-specific whole-task multimedia learning environments, and offers more details on cognitive task analysis to identify job-specific thinking processes. To help one design or select programs that are likely to give a return on investment, the chapter offers the following guidelines: 1) focus on job-specific cognitive and metacognitive skills; 2) consider a whole-task course design; 3) make thinking processes explicit; 4) define job-specific thinking processes. The chapter explains complementary thinking skills, including job-specific creative thinking skills, critical thinking skills, and metacognitive skills. It summarizes the main features that distinguish a whole-task from a part-task design. The chapter reviews a sampling of research studies comparing learning from various forms of whole-task instruction with an alternative approach. Whether one adopts a part-task a whole-task or some combination design, it will be important to use instructional methods that make invisible thinking processes explicit.

Controlled Vocabulary Terms

cognitive process; critical thinking; learning; multimedia; skill; strategic thinking