16. Simulations and Games in e-Learning

  1. Ruth Colvin Clark and
  2. Richard E. Mayer

Published Online: 4 JAN 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781118255971.ch16

e-Learning and the Science of Instruction: Proven Guidelines for Consumers and Designers of Multimedia Learning, Third Edition

e-Learning and the Science of Instruction: Proven Guidelines for Consumers and Designers of Multimedia Learning, Third Edition

How to Cite

Clark, R. C. and Mayer, R. E. (2011) Simulations and Games in e-Learning, in e-Learning and the Science of Instruction: Proven Guidelines for Consumers and Designers of Multimedia Learning, Third Edition, Pfeiffer, San Francisco, CA, USA. doi: 10.1002/9781118255971.ch16

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 4 JAN 2012
  2. Published Print: 1 AUG 2011

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470874301

Online ISBN: 9781118255971

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Keywords:

  • e-learning;
  • instructional games;
  • learning potential;
  • multimedia games;
  • simulations

Summary

Enthusiasts hope to leverage the popularity of entertainment games and simulations to improve learning outcomes. Some argue that the Millennial generation, raised on games and simulations, has different neurological requirements and expectations that demand highly interactive media-intensive learning environments. Instructional games are popular among some adult learners. In a review of research on computer simulations used in many business school settings, Anderson and Lawton found that, with a few exceptions, learners prefer simulation exercises more than either lectures or case discussions. This chapter addresses the question whether simulation or game result in higher e-learning completion rates compared to standard tutorials. It looks beyond the hyperbole on multimedia games and simulations to see what controlled evidence tells us about their learning potential.

Controlled Vocabulary Terms

e-Learning; Game-based learning; simulation