10. Keeping Dry: Managing Urinary Incontinence

  1. Jayna M. Holroyd-Leduc MD, FRCPC3 and
  2. Madhuri Reddy MD, MSc4
  1. Cara Tannenbaum1,2

Published Online: 25 APR 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781118281796.ch10

Evidence-Based Geriatric Medicine: A Practical Clinical Guide

Evidence-Based Geriatric Medicine: A Practical Clinical Guide

How to Cite

Tannenbaum, C. (2010) Keeping Dry: Managing Urinary Incontinence, in Evidence-Based Geriatric Medicine: A Practical Clinical Guide (eds J. M. Holroyd-Leduc and M. Reddy), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118281796.ch10

Editor Information

  1. 3

    Departments of Medicine and Community Health Sciences, Division of Geriatrics, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada

  2. 4

    Hebrew Senior Life, Boston, MA, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Faculties of Medicine and Pharmacy, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada

  2. 2

    Geriatric Incontinence Clinic, Institut Universitaire de Gériatrie, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 25 APR 2012
  2. Published Print: 16 APR 2010

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781444337181

Online ISBN: 9781118281796

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Keywords:

  • urinary incontinence;
  • assessment;
  • management;
  • conservative approaches;
  • pharmacological treatment;
  • models of care;
  • long-term care;
  • dementia

Summary

In those aged 65 years or older, urinary incontinence affects 50% of women and up to 20% of men. Incontinence often remains undertreated despite the availability of successful evidence-based evaluation and management strategies that can be easily implemented in the office and LTC setting. This chapter addresses three clinical topics: (1) the best way to assess urinary incontinence in the office setting; (2) the best options for treating urinary incontinence once the incontinence type and underlying cause(s) have been established; and (3) the best treatment approach for incontinent LTC residents and patients with dementia.