6. The Nail in Dermatological Disease

  1. Robert Baran MD1,2,
  2. David A. R. de Berker MD3,
  3. Mark Holzberg MD4 and
  4. Luc Thomas MD, PhD5
  1. Mark Holzberg MD4 and
  2. Robert Baran MD1,2

Published Online: 23 MAY 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781118286715.ch6

Baran & Dawber's Diseases of the Nails and their Management, Fourth Edition

Baran & Dawber's Diseases of the Nails and their Management, Fourth Edition

How to Cite

Holzberg, M. and Baran, R. (2012) The Nail in Dermatological Disease, in Baran & Dawber's Diseases of the Nails and their Management, Fourth Edition (eds R. Baran, D. A. R. de Berker, M. Holzberg and L. Thomas), Blackwell Publishing Ltd., Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118286715.ch6

Editor Information

  1. 1

    University of Franche-Comté, Cannes, France

  2. 2

    Gustave Roussy Cancer Institute, Villejuif Nail Disease Center, Cannes, France

  3. 3

    Bristol Dermatology Centre, Bristol Royal Infirmary, Bristol, UK

  4. 4

    Department of Dermatology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA

  5. 5

    Department of Dermatology, Lyon 1 University, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Bénite, France

Author Information

  1. 1

    University of Franche-Comté, Cannes, France

  2. 2

    Gustave Roussy Cancer Institute, Villejuif Nail Disease Center, Cannes, France

  3. 4

    Department of Dermatology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 23 MAY 2012
  2. Published Print: 6 JUL 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470657355

Online ISBN: 9781118286715

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Keywords:

  • alopecia areata;
  • lichen planus;
  • nail psoriasis;
  • oil-dropping sign;
  • onycholysis;
  • onychorrhexis;
  • pitting;
  • pterygium;
  • subungual hyperkeratosis;
  • trachyonychia

Summary

Cutaneous disease may present with nail findings. Clinical examination of the nails may help in the diagnosis of skin disease elsewhere, especially in psoriasis, lichen planus and alopecia areata. The clinical appearance of the nail change varies depending on the anatomical site within the nail unit affected – the nail fold, matrix, nail bed, hyponychium or nail plate. Knowledge of the patterns of presentation can help the clinician differentiate between similar nail changes in other cutaneous disease, infections, tumors and in systemic disease. Knowledge of different treatment modalities for these nail unit diseases is important for appropriate resolution of these conditions, especially when scarring might be the outcome