18. Integrated Pest Management – Outbreaks Prevented, Delayed, or Facilitated?

  1. Pedro Barbosa1,
  2. Deborah K. Letourneau2 and
  3. Anurag A. Agrawal3,4
  1. Deborah K. Letourneau

Published Online: 29 JUN 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781118295205.ch18

Insect Outbreaks Revisited

Insect Outbreaks Revisited

How to Cite

Letourneau, D. K. (2012) Integrated Pest Management – Outbreaks Prevented, Delayed, or Facilitated?, in Insect Outbreaks Revisited (eds P. Barbosa, D. K. Letourneau and A. A. Agrawal), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118295205.ch18

Editor Information

  1. 1

    Department of Entomology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 USA

  2. 2

    Environmental Studies Department, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 USA

  3. 3

    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 USA

  4. 4

    Department of Entomology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 USA

Author Information

  1. Environmental Studies Department, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 29 JUN 2012
  2. Published Print: 27 JUL 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781444337594

Online ISBN: 9781118295205

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • IPM, outbreaks prevented, delayed, or facilitated;
  • integrated control, re-establishing biological pest control;
  • IPM in the US, for managing insect outbreaks in agroecosystems;
  • “integrated control” to reduce pest numbers below the EIL;
  • outbreaks, in unmanaged systems versus agroecosystems;
  • natural enemies and herbivore suppression;
  • IPM, and insect suppression tactics;
  • delaying occurrence, by selection for resistance;
  • eventual outcome, insect outbreak not responsive to insecticides

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction

  • Historical development of IPM in the United States

  • The nature of the beast

  • Integrating insect suppression tactics through IPM

  • Conclusions

  • Acknowledgments

  • References