110. The “Biased Rhizosphere” Concept and Advances in the Omics Era to Study Bacterial Competitiveness and Persistence in the Phytosphere

  1. Frans J. de Bruijn
  1. Michael A. Savka1,
  2. Yves Dessaux2,3,
  3. Brian B. McSpadden Gardener4,5,
  4. Samuel Mondy6,
  5. Petra R. A. Kohler7,
  6. Frans J. de Bruijn8 and
  7. Silvia Rossbach7

Published Online: 18 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118297674.ch110

Molecular Microbial Ecology of the Rhizosphere: Volume 1 & 2

Molecular Microbial Ecology of the Rhizosphere: Volume 1 & 2

How to Cite

Savka, M. A., Dessaux, Y., McSpadden Gardener, B. B., Mondy, S., Kohler, P. R. A., de Bruijn, F. J. and Rossbach, S. (2013) The “Biased Rhizosphere” Concept and Advances in the Omics Era to Study Bacterial Competitiveness and Persistence in the Phytosphere, in Molecular Microbial Ecology of the Rhizosphere: Volume 1 & 2 (ed F. J. de Bruijn), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9781118297674.ch110

Editor Information

  1. INRA-CNRS Laboratoire des Interactions Plantes-Microorganismes (LIPM), UMR441-2594 BP52627, F-31320 Castanet-Tolosan, France

Author Information

  1. 1

    The Thomas H. Gosnell School of Life Sciences, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY 14623, USA

  2. 2

    Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, ISV – CNRS, Avenue de la Terrasse, 91198 Gif-sur-Yvette, France

  3. 3

    Institut des sciences du végétal, CNRS (UPR2355), avenue de la terrasse, 91198 Gif sur Yvette, France

  4. 4

    Department of Plant Pathology, Ohio Agriculture Research and Development Center, The Ohio State University, Wooster, OH 44691, USA

  5. 5

    Research Institute for Environmentally-Friendly Agricultural Research, WCU Center for Development of Core Technology for Bio-Environment Control, Chonnam National University, Buk-Gu, Gwangju 500-757, Korea

  6. 6

    Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Institute des Sciences du Vegetal ISV – CNRS, Avenue de la Terrasse, 91198 Gif-sur-Yvette, France

  7. 7

    Department of Biological Sciences, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49005-5410, USA

  8. 8

    INRA-CNRS Laboratoire des Interactions Plantes-Microorganismes (LIPM), UMR441-2594 BP52627, F-31320 Castanet-Tolosan, France

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 18 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 3 MAY 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118296172

Online ISBN: 9781118297674

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Keywords:

  • biased bacteria–plant interactions;
  • comparative genomics;
  • opines;
  • -omics approaches;
  • rhizopine

Summary

The association of plant surfaces with microorganisms has been the subject of intense investigations. Numerous processes have been shown to be important in plant-associative bacteria including attachment, motility, chemotaxis, nutrition, and production of signaling molecules and secondary metabolites. One strategy to favor the competitiveness and persistence of bacteria in the plant environment relies upon manipulation of nutritional compounds secreted into the phytosphere, which comprises the rhizosphere (root surface/zone influenced by secretions) and the phyllosphere (leaf surface/zone influenced by secretions). The pattern of plant host exudate can be bred or engineered to establish biased phytospheres with bacteria that can naturally, or by engineering, use metabolic resources produced by the host plant. Over the last two decades, natural biases, generated by opine-like molecules of Agrobacterium–plant interactions and by rhizopine-like molecules of the Rhizobium–legume interactions, have provided tactics based on unique metabolites produced by plants to favor the competitiveness and persistence of bacteria that can catabolize the host-produced novel nutrients. Over the past 10 years the technology development in rapid genome sequencing has led to a flurry of comparative genomic information on plant-associated bacteria. From genome information recent advances in the application of “omic” techniques (e.g., transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and secretomics) has enabled further investigations of these interactions. From studies of microbial community structure and metagenomics, the impact of changing host rhizosphere chemistry can be more fully realized. A combination of results obtained from these studies will further strengthen our capacity to envision a more complete representation of these complex interactions and predict their impact on plant health. Future studies on plants need to focus on reprogramming transport functions, balancing stress resistance pathways, and altering nutrient availability. Future studies of microorganisms' capacities to uptake secreted nutrients and respond to the associated changes in the microbial community structure will help lead to the construction of effective biased phytospheres.