115. Rhizophagy—A New Dimension of Plant–Microbe Interactions

  1. Frans J. de Bruijn
  1. Chanyarat Paungfoo-Lonhienne1,
  2. Susanne Schmidt1,
  3. Richard I. Webb2 and
  4. Thierry G. A. Lonhienne3

Published Online: 18 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118297674.ch115

Molecular Microbial Ecology of the Rhizosphere: Volume 1 & 2

Molecular Microbial Ecology of the Rhizosphere: Volume 1 & 2

How to Cite

Paungfoo-Lonhienne, C., Schmidt, S., Webb, R. I. and Lonhienne, T. G. A. (2013) Rhizophagy—A New Dimension of Plant–Microbe Interactions, in Molecular Microbial Ecology of the Rhizosphere: Volume 1 & 2 (ed F. J. de Bruijn), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9781118297674.ch115

Editor Information

  1. INRA-CNRS Laboratoire des Interactions Plantes-Microorganismes (LIPM), UMR441-2594 BP52627, F-31320 Castanet-Tolosan, France

Author Information

  1. 1

    School of Agriculture and Food Science, The University of Queensland, St. Lucia, QLD 4072, Australia

  2. 2

    Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Queensland, QLD 4072, Australia

  3. 3

    School of Biochemistry & Molecular Biosciences, The University of Queensland, QLD 4072, Australia

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 18 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 3 MAY 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118296172

Online ISBN: 9781118297674

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Keywords:

  • plant–microbe interactions;
  • plant nutrition;
  • Arabidopsis thaliana;
  • Lycopersicum esculentum;
  • Nicotiana tabacum;
  • Lupinus albus

Summary

We previously showed that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum) take up the nonpathogenic bacterium Escherichia coli and fungus Saccharomyces cerevisiae into root cells, followed by digestion and use as the nutrient source. Here, we extend experimental approaches to a microbe species typically present in the rhizosphere and additional plant species. Similar to E. coli and S. cerevisiae, the bacterium Bradyrhizobium japonicum was incorporated by roots of tomato and Arabidopsis grown in hydroculture and agar, respectively. Uptake of E. coli and S. cerevisiae was confirmed in hydroculture tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and lupin (Lupinus albus). We hypothesize that the ability to acquire microbes is a general ability of angiosperms and this contrasts with the highly specialized incorporation of microbes into nodule-forming N2-fixing plants.