Fifteen. Imperial Satire Reiterated: Late Antiquity through the Twentieth Century

  1. Susanna Braund2 and
  2. Josiah Osgood3
  1. Dan Hooley

Published Online: 21 SEP 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781118301074.ch15

A Companion to Persius and Juvenal

A Companion to Persius and Juvenal

How to Cite

Hooley, D. (2012) Imperial Satire Reiterated: Late Antiquity through the Twentieth Century, in A Companion to Persius and Juvenal (eds S. Braund and J. Osgood), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118301074.ch15

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Stanford, Yale, London, UK

  2. 3

    Georgetown University, USA

Author Information

  1. University of Missouri, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 21 SEP 2012
  2. Published Print: 1 OCT 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405199650

Online ISBN: 9781118301074

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Keywords:

  • prospective, the successors of Persius and Juvenal;
  • imperial satire reiterated, late antiquity to the twentieth century;
  • Persius, intending his satire to be difficult, in reading/psychic processing;
  • stories of satire, sharing narrative qualities, of poems of Horace/Persius/Juvenal;
  • Latin verse satire, though lost, continuing, imitated/processed in verse and prose;
  • stories of Persius/Juvenal, literary afterlives from late antiquity to the present;
  • Persius' dense Latin, appealing to the educated, and Stoicism's broader appeal;
  • satires, inspiration from Persius, with Juvenal's in sixteenth-century English satire;
  • Juvenal's, pre-eminent to Tudor and Elizabethan satirists

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Late Antiquity into the Seventeenth Century

  • English Satire's Big Show: The Long Eighteenth Century

  • A Few Modern Receptions

  • Further Reading