Sixteen. Persius, Juvenal, and the Transformation of Satire in Late Antiquity

  1. Susanna Braund2 and
  2. Josiah Osgood3
  1. Cristiana Sogno

Published Online: 21 SEP 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781118301074.ch16

A Companion to Persius and Juvenal

A Companion to Persius and Juvenal

How to Cite

Sogno, C. (2012) Persius, Juvenal, and the Transformation of Satire in Late Antiquity, in A Companion to Persius and Juvenal (eds S. Braund and J. Osgood), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118301074.ch16

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Stanford, Yale, London, UK

  2. 3

    Georgetown University, USA

Author Information

  1. Fordham University, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 21 SEP 2012
  2. Published Print: 1 OCT 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405199650

Online ISBN: 9781118301074

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Keywords:

  • Persius, Juvenal, and the transformation of satire in late antiquity;
  • Latin hexameter satire, and all-Roman genre, decading with Juvenal;
  • blossoming of prose satire in late antiquity, with verse satire, the blending of genres;
  • concept of satire as by Christian apologists, of the second to fourth centuries;
  • post-classical satire, taking Persius and Juvenal as their preferred models;
  • Christian apologists using satire, in attacking pagans, and their gods;
  • misogyny and misogamy of Tertullian's satiric, in Christian satire;
  • Juvenalian Renaissance, “unorthodox” use of language, as a programmatic satire;
  • Juvenalian tag a “more thematic and interpretive pattern of echoing”;
  • satire in historiography, on vices of the Roman senatorial and of the Roman plebs

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Christian Satire

  • A Juvenalian Renaissance

  • Satire in Historiography

  • A New Theory of Satire

  • Further Reading