Eighteen. Imperial Satire Theorized: Dryden's Discourse of Satire

  1. Susanna Braund1 and
  2. Josiah Osgood2
  1. Josiah Osgood2 and
  2. Susanna Braund1

Published Online: 21 SEP 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781118301074.ch18

A Companion to Persius and Juvenal

A Companion to Persius and Juvenal

How to Cite

Osgood, J. and Braund, S. (2012) Imperial Satire Theorized: Dryden's Discourse of Satire, in A Companion to Persius and Juvenal (eds S. Braund and J. Osgood), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118301074.ch18

Editor Information

  1. 1

    Stanford, Yale, London, UK

  2. 2

    Georgetown University, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Stanford, Yale, London, UK

  2. 2

    Georgetown University, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 21 SEP 2012
  2. Published Print: 1 OCT 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405199650

Online ISBN: 9781118301074

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • imperial satire theorized, Dryden's discourse of satire;
  • Persius/Juvenal as the successors, to the Republican satirists Lucilius and Horace;
  • Persius and Juvenal, viewed as satiric successors of the imperial age;
  • Roman fascination with poetic succession, fruitful to the English “Augustan age”;
  • allusion, to John Dryden, a poet and critic steeped in earlier English poetry;
  • Dryden's support for the king with his satirical poem Absalom and Achitophel;
  • Dryden and satire, practice to theory, and Dryden's discourse in scholarly literature;
  • satiric poetry, being for Dryden a Roman creation, impulse to satire, as invective;
  • Dryden and the idea that a poet's study of his predecessors, as essential in discourse;
  • Persius and Juvenal as exemplars of succession, the poetic succession

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction

  • Dryden and Satire: From Practice to Theory (and Back)

  • Satirists as Successors

  • Persius and Juvenal: Exemplars of Succession

  • Dryden's Ideals for Satire and the Ideals in Practice

  • Conclusion

  • Further Reading