Nineteen. Imperial Satire and the Scholars

  1. Susanna Braund2 and
  2. Josiah Osgood3
  1. Holt N. Parker1 and
  2. Susanna Braund2

Published Online: 21 SEP 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781118301074.ch19

A Companion to Persius and Juvenal

A Companion to Persius and Juvenal

How to Cite

Parker, H. N. and Braund, S. (2012) Imperial Satire and the Scholars, in A Companion to Persius and Juvenal (eds S. Braund and J. Osgood), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118301074.ch19

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Stanford, Yale, London, UK

  2. 3

    Georgetown University, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    University of Cincinnati, USA

  2. 2

    Stanford, Yale, London, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 21 SEP 2012
  2. Published Print: 1 OCT 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405199650

Online ISBN: 9781118301074

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Keywords:

  • imperial satire and the scholars;
  • scholarship on ancient texts, and the reception of Persius and Juvenal;
  • Persius and Juvenal, late antique to Housman's landmark edition of Juvenal;
  • text of Juvenal, acquiring a commentary early, after obscurity in the late 300s;
  • Valla describing his Probus' commentary as “of an exceptional brevity”;
  • matching of the three “Probuses,” leading to three “Cornutuses”;
  • satirists' blunt language, excused as necessary to their task, in persona and irony;
  • imperial satirists in the Renaissance Canon and Classroom;
  • Renaissance commentaries on Persius, editio princeps, of Juvenal and Persius

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • The Earliest Commentaries

  • Will the Real Probus Please Stand Up?

  • Who Was Cornutus?

  • Persius and Juvenal at School

  • The Imperial Satirists in the Renaissance Canon and Classroom

  • Renaissance Scholarship on Juvenal and Persius

  • Pithou's Legacy

  • Interpolation Hunting

  • “Editors, For The Use Of…”

  • Examples

  • Further Reading