Fourteen. Sediment Flux at the Catchment Scale: Source-To-Sink Relationships

  1. Kirstie A. Fryirs1 and
  2. Gary J. Brierley2

Published Online: 28 SEP 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781118305454.ch14

Geomorphic Analysis of River Systems: An Approach to Reading the Landscape

Geomorphic Analysis of River Systems: An Approach to Reading the Landscape

How to Cite

Fryirs, K. A. and Brierley, G. J. (2012) Sediment Flux at the Catchment Scale: Source-To-Sink Relationships, in Geomorphic Analysis of River Systems: An Approach to Reading the Landscape, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118305454.ch14

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Environment and Geography, Macquarie University, North Ryde, NSW 2109, Australia

  2. 2

    School of Environment, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 SEP 2012
  2. Published Print: 16 NOV 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405192750

Online ISBN: 9781118305454

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Keywords:

  • catchment scale;
  • landscape;
  • sediment budget;
  • sediment flux;
  • source-to-sink relationships

Summary

Prediction of magnitude-frequency relationships that fashion sediment flux, and associated implications across a catchment, are important considerations in risk and hazard management. This chapter first conceptualises sediment flux at the catchment scale through analysis of sediment inputs, outputs and stores, outlining how quantification of sediment delivery underpins construction of sediment budgets. Sediment budget flow diagrams summarise source-to-sink relationships that characterise catchment sediment cascades. A cross-scalar approach to analysis of sediment cascades is developed. Assessment of catchment-scale sediment flux entails analysis of: landscape setting and memory, the strength of connectivity between various landscape compartments, reach-scale adjustments and sensitivity, and process-form associations of geomorphic units within a reach. Finally, sediment flux is analysed across three scales: global, landscape setting and catchment-scale analyses. Examples are used to show how analysis of catchment-scale sediment flux and connectivity can be used to assess river recovery in different landscape settings.