Fifteen. The Usefulness of River Geomorphology: Reading the Landscape in Practice

  1. Kirstie A. Fryirs1 and
  2. Gary J. Brierley2

Published Online: 28 SEP 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781118305454.ch15

Geomorphic Analysis of River Systems: An Approach to Reading the Landscape

Geomorphic Analysis of River Systems: An Approach to Reading the Landscape

How to Cite

Fryirs, K. A. and Brierley, G. J. (2012) The Usefulness of River Geomorphology: Reading the Landscape in Practice, in Geomorphic Analysis of River Systems: An Approach to Reading the Landscape, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118305454.ch15

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Environment and Geography, Macquarie University, North Ryde, NSW 2109, Australia

  2. 2

    School of Environment, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 SEP 2012
  2. Published Print: 16 NOV 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405192750

Online ISBN: 9781118305454

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • catchment;
  • landscape;
  • river diversity;
  • river evolution;
  • river geomorphology;
  • river systems;
  • system dynamics

Summary

The critical role of geomorphic enquiry in informing cross-disciplinary applications builds upon catchment-specific analyses of landscape diversity. Increasingly, economic cases for environmental applications recognise the importance of ‘working with nature’ as a basis for cost-effective practices. Working with the business sector will play an ever-increasing role in the emergence of ‘useful geomorphology’. In this chapter, emphasis is placed upon three primary principles that guide the application of geomorphic understandings of river systems: 1. Respect diversity by reading the landscape. 2. Appreciate system dynamics and evolution by reading the landscape. 3. Bring together spatial and temporal considerations to read the landscape in efforts to know your catchment. Understanding catchment-specific patterns of river types, their connectivity and their adjustment in response to human disturbance are key considerations in the development of place-based approaches to river management.