Seven. Channel Geometry

  1. Kirstie A. Fryirs1 and
  2. Gary J. Brierley2

Published Online: 28 SEP 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781118305454.ch7

Geomorphic Analysis of River Systems: An Approach to Reading the Landscape

Geomorphic Analysis of River Systems: An Approach to Reading the Landscape

How to Cite

Fryirs, K. A. and Brierley, G. J. (2012) Channel Geometry, in Geomorphic Analysis of River Systems: An Approach to Reading the Landscape, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118305454.ch7

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Environment and Geography, Macquarie University, North Ryde, NSW 2109, Australia

  2. 2

    School of Environment, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 SEP 2012
  2. Published Print: 16 NOV 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405192750

Online ISBN: 9781118305454

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Keywords:

  • bank processes;
  • bed processes;
  • channel geometry;
  • channel shape;
  • channel size;
  • hydraulic geometry

Summary

Channel shape and size are among the most obvious attributes of river systems. Discharge, flow hydraulic relationships and sediment transport mechanisms influence channel geometry. This chapter examines how interactions between these factors affect channel size and shape. Channel morphology can be differentiated into symmetrical, asymmetrical, compound or irregular forms. Prior to discussing principles of hydraulic geometry, the bed and bank processes that influence channel size and shape are outlined. Erosional and depositional processes along the bed and bank produce channel size and shape. The bed processes that influence channel shape include incision and aggradation, and the bank processes that influence channel shape include bank erosion and morphology. Hydraulic geometry principles can be used to assess adjustments to channel shape and size over time.