8. Comparative Evolutionary Genomics of Land Plants

  1. Barbara A. Ambrose2 and
  2. Michael Purugganan3,4
  1. Amy Litt

Published Online: 26 NOV 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781118305881.ch8

Annual Plant Reviews Volume 45: The Evolution of Plant Form

Annual Plant Reviews Volume 45: The Evolution of Plant Form

How to Cite

Litt, A. (2013) Comparative Evolutionary Genomics of Land Plants, in Annual Plant Reviews Volume 45: The Evolution of Plant Form (eds B. A. Ambrose and M. Purugganan), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., Chichester, West Sussex, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118305881.ch8

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Cullman Assistant Curator in Plant Genomics The New York Botanical Garden Bronx, NY 10458, USA

  2. 3

    Dorothy Schiff Professor of Genomics Department of Biology Center for Genomics and Systems Biology New York University New York, NY 10011, USA

  3. 4

    Center for Genomics and Systems Biology NYU Abu Dhabi Institute New York University Abu Dhabi Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

Author Information

  1. The New York Botanical Garden, Bronx, NY, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 NOV 2012
  2. Published Print: 11 JAN 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781444330014

Online ISBN: 9781118305881

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • complexity;
  • domestication;
  • gene family expansion;
  • genome size;
  • transposable elements;
  • whole genome duplication

Summary

The evolution of land plants is characterized by increasing adaptation to the terrestrial environment and increasing structural complexity. Flowering plants have more elaborate structure and life cycles than do mosses, and have diversified and colonized a wider variety of habitats. Nonetheless, analyses suggest that on average flowering plants have neither larger genomes nor more genes than mosses. Genome size varies dramatically among embryophytes but the most significant factor appears to be amplification of transposable elements, which not only mediate genome size but dynamically affect genome structure and function as well. Along with whole genome duplications and lineage-specific expansion of individual gene families, they are responsible for shaping land plant genomes, generating substantial differences in genome size, gene number, and gene order even among closely related cultivars. Comparative analyses of fully sequenced genomes have shed substantial light on the dynamics of genome and gene family evolution; they are just beginning, however, to help us understand the molecular basis of the key adaptations that have allowed plants to thrive on land.