17. Peripheral Pro-inflammatory Cytokines and Cognitive Aging: The Role of Metabolic Risk

  1. Alexander W. Kusnecov and
  2. Hymie Anisman
  1. Alvin Lim and
  2. Anna Marsland

Published Online: 1 NOV 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118314814.ch17

The Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of Psychoneuroimmunology

The Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of Psychoneuroimmunology

How to Cite

Lim, A. and Marsland, A. (2013) Peripheral Pro-inflammatory Cytokines and Cognitive Aging: The Role of Metabolic Risk, in The Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of Psychoneuroimmunology (eds A. W. Kusnecov and H. Anisman), John Wiley & Sons Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118314814.ch17

Author Information

  1. Department of Psychology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 1 NOV 2013
  2. Published Print: 25 NOV 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781119979517

Online ISBN: 9781118314814

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Keywords:

  • adiposity;
  • dementia;
  • hippocampus;
  • neurocognitive aging;
  • obesity;
  • peripheral inflammation;
  • prefrontal cortex (PFC);
  • pro-inflammatory cytokines

Summary

This chapter examines evidence linking peripheral inflammation and its sources to human neurocognitive function, it considers the possibility that age-related increases in inflammation and related metabolic risk may contribute to the pathophysiology of accelerated neurocognitive aging, ultimately increasing risk for dementia in later life. Obesity reflects a chronic subclinical inflammatory condition. Recently, central adiposity, described as adipose tissue surrounding the visceral abdominal organs, has been identified as a particularly potent source of circulating inflammatory mediators. Within the central nervous system, receptors for pro-inflammatory cytokines are expressed on microglia and are concentrated in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC). In accordance with animal studies, there are several independent lines of research that support an association between peripheral inflammation and the modulation of cognitive function in humans. Studies of human dementia suggest that pro-inflammatory cytokines play a pathogenic role in several age-related diseases that involve impairments of cognitive function.