24. An Inflammatory Perspective of Stress and Human Depressive Disorder

  1. Alexander W. Kusnecov and
  2. Hymie Anisman
  1. Marie-Claude Audet,
  2. Shlomit Jacobson-Pick,
  3. Robyn J. McQuaid and
  4. Hymie Anisman

Published Online: 1 NOV 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118314814.ch24

The Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of Psychoneuroimmunology

The Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of Psychoneuroimmunology

How to Cite

Audet, M.-C., Jacobson-Pick, S., McQuaid, R. J. and Anisman, H. (2013) An Inflammatory Perspective of Stress and Human Depressive Disorder, in The Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of Psychoneuroimmunology (eds A. W. Kusnecov and H. Anisman), John Wiley & Sons Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118314814.ch24

Author Information

  1. Department of Neuroscience, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 1 NOV 2013
  2. Published Print: 25 NOV 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781119979517

Online ISBN: 9781118314814

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Keywords:

  • depressive disorders;
  • inflammation;
  • stress;
  • stressors

Summary

This chapter discusses the contributions of inflammatory activation, particularly that of pro-inflammatory cytokines, in depressive illness and the specific role of stressors may have in this regard. In so doing, the authors necessarily consider the various approaches used to link cytokine functioning and depressive illness. Associations between circulating levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and depressive disorders have provided valuable information concerning the implications of peripheral inflammation in relation to depressive illness. The relationships between elevated inflammation and depression may be moderated by stressors, or alternatively, inflammatory processes might give rise to stressor-like neurochemical changes (e.g., monoamine variations) that come to elicit depressive symptoms. Several animal studies have been conducted in an effort to describe the behavioral syndrome associated with inflammatory activation and to define the factors responsible for the behavioral and biological effects of cytokines.