3. Pediatric Liver Disease: An Approach to Diagnosis and Assessment of Severity

  1. E. Jenny Heathcote MB, BS, MD, FRCP, FRCP(C)3,4,5,6
  1. Binita M. Kamath MBBChir, MRCP, MTR1,4 and
  2. Vicky L. Ng MD, FRCPC1,2,4

Published Online: 4 SEP 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781118314968.ch3

Hepatology: Diagnosis and Clinical Management

Hepatology: Diagnosis and Clinical Management

How to Cite

Kamath, B. M. and Ng, V. L. (2012) Pediatric Liver Disease: An Approach to Diagnosis and Assessment of Severity, in Hepatology: Diagnosis and Clinical Management (ed E. J. Heathcote), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118314968.ch3

Editor Information

  1. 3

    Francis Family Chair in Hepatology Research, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

  2. 4

    University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

  3. 5

    Patient Based Clinical Research Division, Toronto Western Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

  4. 6

    University Health Network/Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Author Information

  1. 1

    Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

  2. 2

    Sick Kids Transplant Center, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

  3. 4

    University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 4 SEP 2012
  2. Published Print: 12 OCT 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470656174

Online ISBN: 9781118314968

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Keywords:

  • neonatal cholestasis;
  • splenomegaly;
  • hepatomegaly;
  • children;
  • acute liver failure

Summary

The rapid growth of pediatric hepatology as a specific and focused field of interest is attributable to the importance of the dramatic physiologic variables occurring in the maturing liver as well as recognition of the unique nature of the liver diseases that affect infants and children. As with adults, the assessment of liver disease in children requires a careful history and physical examination; however, further investigations are directed by likely diagnoses, which differ significantly by age. Infants and young children, in particular, require careful assessment for congenital and inherited metabolic diseases. The assessment of liver disease in children involves directed laboratory investigations, radiologic investigations, and often a liver biopsy. The interpretation of these data requires the input of pediatric subspecialists. In this chapter we provide an overview of the common clinical presentations of pediatric liver disease and a rational approach to their investigation.