5. The Humanitarian Free and Open-Source Software Project: Engaging Students in Service-Learning through Building Software

  1. Brian A. Nejmeh
  1. Ralph Morelli,
  2. Trishan de Lanerolle and
  3. Allen Tucker

Published Online: 7 JUN 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781118319130.ch5

Service-Learning in the Computer and Information Sciences: Practical Applications in Engineering Education

Service-Learning in the Computer and Information Sciences: Practical Applications in Engineering Education

How to Cite

Morelli, R., de Lanerolle, T. and Tucker, A. (2012) The Humanitarian Free and Open-Source Software Project: Engaging Students in Service-Learning through Building Software, in Service-Learning in the Computer and Information Sciences: Practical Applications in Engineering Education (ed B. A. Nejmeh), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9781118319130.ch5

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 7 JUN 2012
  2. Published Print: 21 MAY 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118100349

Online ISBN: 9781118319130

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Keywords:

  • FOSS development;
  • HFOSS Project

Summary

Begun in 2006, the Humanitarian Free and Open-Source Software Project (HFOSS Project) is an educational initiative whose goal is to engage undergraduates in computer science by building free and open-source software (FOSS) that benefits humanity, both locally and globally. Contributions to the HFOSS Project come from professionals in academia, IT organizations, and nonprofit organizations who together engage undergraduate students in courses, research projects, and summer internship experiences. Its curriculum is accessible to a wide range of undergraduates, since it includes courses for nonmajors as well as computer science and engineering majors. This chapter will discuss the origin, goals, curricular and cocurricular activities, accomplishments, and future challenges of the HFOSS Project. We emphasize the HFOSS Project’s service-learning components, its pedagogical organization, its impacts, and its potential as a catalyst for initiating similar activities across a broad range of undergraduate programs in the information sciences.

Controlled Vocabulary Terms

public domain software