16. Children and Divorce in World Perspective

  1. Angela Abela and
  2. Janet Walker
  1. Paul R. Amato and
  2. Lisa M. Boyd

Published Online: 4 OCT 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118320990.ch16

Contemporary Issues in Family Studies: Global Perspectives on Partnerships, Parenting and Support in a Changing World

Contemporary Issues in Family Studies: Global Perspectives on Partnerships, Parenting and Support in a Changing World

How to Cite

Amato, P. R. and Boyd, L. M. (2013) Children and Divorce in World Perspective, in Contemporary Issues in Family Studies: Global Perspectives on Partnerships, Parenting and Support in a Changing World (eds A. Abela and J. Walker), John Wiley & Sons, Oxford. doi: 10.1002/9781118320990.ch16

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 4 OCT 2013
  2. Published Print: 31 OCT 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781119971030

Online ISBN: 9781118320990

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Keywords:

  • divorce;
  • Second Demographic Transition;
  • child wellbeing;
  • meta-analysis;
  • cross-national research;
  • child adjustment;
  • post-divorce parenting

Summary

Divorce rates are rising in many places in the world, including Canada, the USA, Australia, New Zealand, most European nations, and many Asian societies. An important explanation for this worldwide increase highlights greater individualism and self-fulfilment, known as the Second Demographic Transition. Studies from English-speaking countries show that children with divorced parents score lower on measures of achievement, adjustment and general wellbeing than children with continuously married parents. This chapter uses meta-analytic methods to summarise 26 studies conducted in Europe, Asia and other parts of the world. These studies yield results comparable to those of earlier meta-analyses, which show that in general, children with divorced parents appear to be disadvantaged. As societies modernise, responsibility is focused on the nuclear family to care for and raise children. This trend makes children especially vulnerable to disruptions in the family of origin.