2. Dukkha, Non-Self, and the Teaching on the Four “Noble Truths”1

  1. Steven M. Emmanuel
  1. Peter Harvey

Published Online: 5 FEB 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118324004.ch2

A Companion to Buddhist Philosophy

A Companion to Buddhist Philosophy

How to Cite

Harvey, P. (2013) Dukkha, Non-Self, and the Teaching on the Four “Noble Truths”1, in A Companion to Buddhist Philosophy (ed S. M. Emmanuel), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118324004.ch2

Author Information

  1. University of Sunderland, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 5 FEB 2013
  2. Published Print: 25 MAR 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470658772

Online ISBN: 9781118324004

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Keywords:

  • Buddhism;
  • DCPS;
  • dukkha;
  • khandhas;
  • Noble Truth;
  • non-self;
  • reality

Summary

In what is portrayed as Buddha's first sermon, the Dhamma-cakka-ppavatana Sutta (DCPS), the Buddha highlighted four key aspects or dimensions of existence to which one needs to become attuned so as to become deeply spiritually transformed and end dukkha. Though the DCPS emphasizes dukkha, this is in fact only one of three related characteristics or “marks” of the five khandhas. These “three marks” of all conditioned phenomena are that they are impermanent, painful, and non-Self. Buddhism emphasizes that change and impermanence are fundamental features of everything. The Four True Realities for the Spiritually Ennobled and statements which point to these realities, such as “This is dukkha,” form the structural framework for all higher teachings of early Buddhism.