3. The Conditioned Co-arising of Mental and Bodily Processes within Life and Between Lives1

  1. Steven M. Emmanuel
  1. Peter Harvey

Published Online: 5 FEB 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118324004.ch3

A Companion to Buddhist Philosophy

A Companion to Buddhist Philosophy

How to Cite

Harvey, P. (2013) The Conditioned Co-arising of Mental and Bodily Processes within Life and Between Lives1, in A Companion to Buddhist Philosophy (ed S. M. Emmanuel), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118324004.ch3

Author Information

  1. University of Sunderland, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 5 FEB 2013
  2. Published Print: 25 MAR 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470658772

Online ISBN: 9781118324004

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Keywords:

  • Buddhism;
  • conditioned co-arising;
  • life;
  • Mahāyāna movement;
  • mind organ;
  • physical sense organs

Summary

The understanding of conditioned co-arising is central to Buddhist practice and development. This chapter presents the principle of conditionality, which can be applied to all processes, events, and things, physical or mental, in the universe. Besides explaining the origin of dukkha, the conditioned co-arising formula also explains karma, rebirth, and the functioning of personality, all without the need to invoke a permanent self. Buddhism sees the basic root of the pain and stress of life as spiritual ignorance, rather than sin. The between-lives period has three phases: inclining to a further rebirth, seeking it here and there, and falling from one's previous identity into a new rebirth. In the Mahāyāna movement, various uses were made of the conditioned co-arising. As a general point on conditioned co-arising, it should be noted that it presents a “middle” way of understanding that echoes the Buddhist path as a “middle way” of practice.