1. The Organization of Anthropology and Higher Education in the United States

  1. D. Douglas Caulkins2 and
  2. Ann T. Jordan3
  1. Davydd J. Greenwood

Published Online: 2 OCT 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781118325513.ch1

A Companion to Organizational Anthropology

A Companion to Organizational Anthropology

How to Cite

Greenwood, D. J. (2012) The Organization of Anthropology and Higher Education in the United States, in A Companion to Organizational Anthropology (eds D. D. Caulkins and A. T. Jordan), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118325513.ch1

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Social Entrepreneurs of Grinnell, USA

  2. 3

    University of North Texas, USA

Author Information

  1. Cornell University, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 2 OCT 2012
  2. Published Print: 29 OCT 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405199827

Online ISBN: 9781118325513

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Keywords:

  • economic anthropology;
  • higher education;
  • organizational anthropology;
  • political economy;
  • social structure;
  • Tayloristic models;
  • United States

Summary

This chapter focuses on a particular set of historical conditions and practices that separated anthropology from organizational studies using a combination of organizational behavior and organizational culture perspectives. Economic anthropology offers perspectives and techniques of potential value in the analysis of academia. This chapter presents a few of the many ways approaches from economic anthropology can be applied to academia. The work of generations of anthropologists on the structure and dynamics of systems of classification, on the endless variation and complexity of distinctions between nature and culture, and on the impact of worldviews on the organization of everyday life is also relevant to higher education. A comparative examination of higher education systems across the United States and around the world makes it clear that the Tayloristic organization of research universities in current use is only one of the possible Tayloristic models that could have been used.