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2. Aemilia Lanyer and the ‘First Fruits’ of Women's Wit

  1. Helen Wilcox

Published Online: 30 NOV 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118327647.ch2

1611: Authority, Gender and the Word in Early Modern England

1611: Authority, Gender and the Word in Early Modern England

How to Cite

Wilcox, H. (ed) (2014) Aemilia Lanyer and the ‘First Fruits’ of Women's Wit, in 1611: Authority, Gender and the Word in Early Modern England, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118327647.ch2

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 30 NOV 2013
  2. Published Print: 2 JAN 2014

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405193917

Online ISBN: 9781118327647

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Keywords:

  • Aemilia Lanyer;
  • early modern women;
  • Manuscript Culture;
  • Salve Deus;
  • textual culture of 1611;
  • virtuous ladies

Summary

Aemilia Lanyer is a hugely important figure in the history of women's poetry, and her publication of Salve Deus is one of the landmarks of textual culture in 1611. Salve Deus offers, among many other things, an alternative vision of the virtuous nature and characteristics of women. What is unique about Lanyer's contribution to the textual culture of 1611 is her determination to ‘unlock’ the hidden identity of the female poetic voice in print publication. The survival of a hundred letters written by Arbella Stuart between 1588 and 1611 is not only a remarkable phenomenon in its own right but hints significantly at the otherwise lost wealth of social and personal writing in manuscript by women from this period. In addition to these invaluable caches of letters, there were several other elements of manuscript culture to which women contributed in 1611.