3. Coryats Crudities and the ‘Travelling Wonder’ of the Age

  1. Helen Wilcox

Published Online: 30 NOV 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118327647.ch3

1611: Authority, Gender and the Word in Early Modern England

1611: Authority, Gender and the Word in Early Modern England

How to Cite

Wilcox, H. (ed) (2014) Coryats Crudities and the ‘Travelling Wonder’ of the Age, in 1611: Authority, Gender and the Word in Early Modern England, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118327647.ch3

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 30 NOV 2013
  2. Published Print: 2 JAN 2014

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405193917

Online ISBN: 9781118327647

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Keywords:

  • 1611;
  • Britaine-Ulysses;
  • Coryats Crudities;
  • satire;
  • strange wonders;
  • The Odcombian Banquet;
  • travel

Summary

One of the most idiosyncratic texts of 1611, Coryats Crudities, appears to have been designed to make the most of the contemporary fascination with travel. The humanist emphasis here is on combined ‘pleasure and profit’ – echoing the classical principle that poetry and other arts should simultaneously ‘teach and delight’. Thomas Coryate sought the support of ‘some of the worthyest spirits of this Kingdome’ in the form of publishable poems, and this effort was so successful that the title page and commendatory texts were only included in the Crudities and published separately later in the year in a pirated work known as The Odcombian Banquet. The pages preceding Coryate's accounts of his travels must constitute the year's largest single collection of satirical writing. Coryate travelled to strange or foreign lands, and in turn, became the ‘travelling Wonder of our daies’, the object of exuberant satirical invention by his friends.