7. ‘The New World of Words’: Authorising Translation in 1611

  1. Helen Wilcox

Published Online: 30 NOV 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118327647.ch7

1611: Authority, Gender and the Word in Early Modern England

1611: Authority, Gender and the Word in Early Modern England

How to Cite

Wilcox, H. (ed) (2014) ‘The New World of Words’: Authorising Translation in 1611, in 1611: Authority, Gender and the Word in Early Modern England, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118327647.ch7

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 30 NOV 2013
  2. Published Print: 2 JAN 2014

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405193917

Online ISBN: 9781118327647

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Keywords:

  • dictionaries;
  • King James Version (KJV);
  • new world of words;
  • The Iliads of Homer;
  • translation in 1611

Summary

Among the many English publications of 1611 were two dictionaries of considerable significance for the relationship of English to other European languages: John Florio's Queen Anna's New World of Words and Randle Cotgrave's A Dictionarie of the French and English Tongues. The practice of translation was central to the great humanist project of the Renaissance. Two highly significant translations in 1611 include: the Holy Bible in English, known as the Authorised or King James Version (KJV), and George Chapman's The Iliads of Homer rendered into English verse. The King James Bible was a work of formidable scholarship in the best humanist tradition. The publication of the new translation was a major event in the textual culture of 1611. The translations coming to fruition in 1611 testify to the full range of the ‘arte’ and ‘skill’ of both sacred and secular expression.