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Conclusion: ‘This Scribling Age’

  1. Helen Wilcox

Published Online: 30 NOV 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118327647.oth

1611: Authority, Gender and the Word in Early Modern England

1611: Authority, Gender and the Word in Early Modern England

How to Cite

Wilcox, H. (ed) (2014) Conclusion: ‘This Scribling Age’, in 1611: Authority, Gender and the Word in Early Modern England, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118327647.oth

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 30 NOV 2013
  2. Published Print: 2 JAN 2014

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781405193917

Online ISBN: 9781118327647

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Keywords:

  • intertextual richness of 1611;
  • textual culture;
  • tragicomedy

Summary

Tragicomedy is a genre of transition, crossing from danger to safety, from a tragic perception of the world to a potentially comic interpretation. This is a particularly apt dramatic mode for a year in which a great deal was in transition politically and textually. One of the key activities in the textual culture of 1611 is translation – by which is meant both the work of transferring a text from one language to another, and the wider culture of reinterpretation and rereading. This chapter shows how the ′anatomy′ of an individual year in terms of its textual and creative impulses can cumulatively reveal a distinctive cultural mood. It focuses on the intertextual richness of 1611. In 1611, a great number of strange and fascinating things were written, performed and published. The chapter offers a glimpse of the rich and densely interwoven textual culture of one early modern year.