1. Introduction to Clinical Assessment for Eating Disorders

  1. John R. E. Fox1 and
  2. Ken P. Goss2
  1. Ken Goss2 and
  2. John R. E. Fox1

Published Online: 3 OCT 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781118328910.ch1

Eating and its Disorders

Eating and its Disorders

How to Cite

Goss, K. and Fox, J. R. E. (2012) Introduction to Clinical Assessment for Eating Disorders, in Eating and its Disorders (eds J. R. E. Fox and K. P. Goss), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118328910.ch1

Editor Information

  1. 1

    Division of Clinical Psychology, University of Manchester, UK

  2. 2

    Coventry Eating Disorders Service, United Kingdom

Author Information

  1. 1

    Division of Clinical Psychology, University of Manchester, UK

  2. 2

    Coventry Eating Disorders Service, United Kingdom

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 3 OCT 2012
  2. Published Print: 9 OCT 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470683545

Online ISBN: 9781118328910

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Keywords:

  • anorexia nervosa (AN);
  • bulimia nervosa (BN);
  • clinical assessment;
  • eating disorder diagnoses;
  • eating disorders (EDs);
  • eating disorders not otherwise specified (EDNOS)

Summary

This introductory chapter to clinical assessment for eating disorders (EDs) outlines the most frequently used eating disorder diagnoses and how these may relate to the course of illness and prognosis. One of the most commonly used classificatory systems for mental health diagnosis (DSM-IV; APA, 2004) groups EDs into three main types: anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN) and atypical eating disorders or eating disorders not otherwise specified (EDNOS). The course and outcome of EDs is extremely variable and appears to involve the complex interplay of a number of factors that dictate the nature of the course of the ED. The chapter briefly mentions some of the difficulties with the diagnostic categorization of people with an ED.