13. Neuropsychological Inefficiences in Anorexia Nervosa Targeted in Clinical Practice: The Development of a Module of Cognitive Remediation Therapy

  1. John R. E. Fox3 and
  2. Ken P. Goss4
  1. Carolina Lopez1,
  2. Helen Davies2 and
  3. Kate Tchanturia2

Published Online: 3 OCT 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781118328910.ch13

Eating and its Disorders

Eating and its Disorders

How to Cite

Lopez, C., Davies, H. and Tchanturia, K. (2012) Neuropsychological Inefficiences in Anorexia Nervosa Targeted in Clinical Practice: The Development of a Module of Cognitive Remediation Therapy, in Eating and its Disorders (eds J. R. E. Fox and K. P. Goss), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118328910.ch13

Editor Information

  1. 3

    Division of Clinical Psychology, University of Manchester, UK

  2. 4

    Coventry Eating Disorders Service, United Kingdom

Author Information

  1. 1

    University of Chile, Chile

  2. 2

    Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 3 OCT 2012
  2. Published Print: 9 OCT 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470683545

Online ISBN: 9781118328910

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Keywords:

  • aetiological treatment;
  • anorexia nervosa (AN);
  • cognitive remediation therapy (CRT);
  • CRT sessions;
  • neuropsychological inefficiencies

Summary

This chapter presents an outline of the development and implementation of a novel intervention specifically designed to target neuropsychological inefficiencies in clients with anorexia nervosa (AN). The chapter is divided into four sections. In the first section, current treatment options and neuropsychological profiles in AN are outlined. In order to improve the disappointing scenario for AN treatment, there has been a call to develop interventions that focus on addressing both risk and aetiological factors as well as evidence-based maintenance models. In the second section, a module of cognitive remediation therapy (CRT), which includes specific techniques to address difficulties in global processing (weak central coherence) and cognitive rigidity (set-shifting), is described. In the third section, qualitative and quantitative outcomes are summarized. Finally, future development and research implications of CRT will be discussed.