10. The Role of Stimulus Properties and Cognitive Processes in the Quality of the Multisensory Perception of Synchrony

  1. Liliana Albertazzi
  1. Argiro Vatakis

Published Online: 31 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118329016.ch10

Handbook of Experimental Phenomenology: Visual Perception of Shape, Space and Appearance

Handbook of Experimental Phenomenology: Visual Perception of Shape, Space and Appearance

How to Cite

Vatakis, A. (2013) The Role of Stimulus Properties and Cognitive Processes in the Quality of the Multisensory Perception of Synchrony, in Handbook of Experimental Phenomenology: Visual Perception of Shape, Space and Appearance (ed L. Albertazzi), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118329016.ch10

Editor Information

  1. University of Trento Center for the Mind and Brain (CIMeC), Italy

Author Information

  1. Cognitive Systems Research Institute (CSRI), Greece

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 31 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 30 APR 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781119954682

Online ISBN: 9781118329016

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Keywords:

  • cognitive processes;
  • multisensory events;
  • stimulus properties;
  • synchrony perception;
  • temporal window

Summary

This chapter describes how the question of synchrony perception came about in experimental psychology. In an attempt to better understand synchrony perception, researchers have focused on the “behavior” of the temporal window of integration by manipulating stimulus parameters and presenting different modalities and events. The characteristics of the temporal window of synchrony were found to be true in many investigations of synchrony perception. It is pertinent to explore the now known factors that modulate the temporal window of integration in order to be able to model the “behavior” in the future and possibly manage to explore the mechanisms of synchrony perception more efficiently. The chapter provides an overview of some of the factors modulating synchrony perception for multisensory events by focusing on the auditory and visual modalities. Recent studies have manipulated orientation of the visual display in order to investigate how an otherwise unchanged stimulus can affect synchrony perception.