19. Basic Colors and Image Features

The Case for an Analogy

  1. Liliana Albertazzi
  1. Lewis D. Griffin

Published Online: 31 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118329016.ch19

Handbook of Experimental Phenomenology: Visual Perception of Shape, Space and Appearance

Handbook of Experimental Phenomenology: Visual Perception of Shape, Space and Appearance

How to Cite

Griffin, L. D. (2013) Basic Colors and Image Features, in Handbook of Experimental Phenomenology: Visual Perception of Shape, Space and Appearance (ed L. Albertazzi), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118329016.ch19

Editor Information

  1. University of Trento Center for the Mind and Brain (CIMeC), Italy

Author Information

  1. University College, London, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 31 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 30 APR 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781119954682

Online ISBN: 9781118329016

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Keywords:

  • analogy;
  • basic colors;
  • categorical level;
  • image features;
  • sensory level

Summary

This chapter presents the case for an analogy between color and local image structure. The analogy extends over three levels of processing: sensory; post-sensory, where the sensory information is re-represented to achieve desired invariances; and the categorical level where sensations have been classified. The analogy at the categorical level is between basic colors such as red, orange, and white, and image features such as edges, lines, and blobs. This is necessary because each stage, to a great extent, inherits the fact of the analogy from the previous stage. So, in the end, the analogy at the category level arises as inevitable given the analogy at the sensory level. The chapter closes with a discussion of points arising, including a weighing of the similarities and differences, and a prediction about the location of the basic color foci within the color solid that follows from the analogy presented.