4. Multistable Visual Perception as a Gateway to the Neuronal Correlates of Phenomenal Consciousness

The Scope and Limits of Neuroscientific Analysis

  1. Liliana Albertazzi
  1. Theofanis I. Panagiotaropoulos and
  2. Nikos K. Logothetis

Published Online: 31 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118329016.ch4

Handbook of Experimental Phenomenology: Visual Perception of Shape, Space and Appearance

Handbook of Experimental Phenomenology: Visual Perception of Shape, Space and Appearance

How to Cite

Panagiotaropoulos, T. I. and Logothetis, N. K. (2013) Multistable Visual Perception as a Gateway to the Neuronal Correlates of Phenomenal Consciousness, in Handbook of Experimental Phenomenology: Visual Perception of Shape, Space and Appearance (ed L. Albertazzi), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118329016.ch4

Editor Information

  1. University of Trento Center for the Mind and Brain (CIMeC), Italy

Author Information

  1. Max Planck Institute, Biological Cybernetics, Tübingen, Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 31 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 30 APR 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781119954682

Online ISBN: 9781118329016

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Keywords:

  • cognitive processes;
  • experimental phenomenology;
  • multistable visual perception;
  • neuronal correlates;
  • neuroscientific method

Summary

This chapter focuses on the neuronal correlates of multistable perception as a method that could provides significant insights into the neuronal correlates of consciousness. It describes the current state of knowledge on the contribution of cortical and subcortical areas in subjective visual perception as measured by the presentation of multistable stimulus configurations, mainly binocular rivalry, coupled with invasive and noninvasive recordings of neurophysiological signals. The findings from these experiments apparently support the view that correlates of subjective visual perception are found across different primary and secondary sensory and associational cortical and subcortical areas. This chapter ensures that the neuroscientific method, assisted by phenomenological psychophysics and computational neuroscience, has potentially unlimited power, constrained only by the experimental methods used in revealing the neuronal correlates of cognitive processes.