14. Using Historical Ecology to Inform Wildlife Conservation, Restoration, and Management

  1. John A. Wiens3,4,
  2. Gregory D. Hayward5,6,
  3. Hugh D. Safford7,8 and
  4. Catherine M. Giffen9
  1. Beth A. Hahn1 and
  2. John L. Curnutt2

Published Online: 8 JUL 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781118329726.ch14

Historical Environmental Variation in Conservation and Natural Resource Management

Historical Environmental Variation in Conservation and Natural Resource Management

How to Cite

Hahn, B. A. and Curnutt, J. L. (2012) Using Historical Ecology to Inform Wildlife Conservation, Restoration, and Management, in Historical Environmental Variation in Conservation and Natural Resource Management (eds J. A. Wiens, G. D. Hayward, H. D. Safford and C. M. Giffen), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118329726.ch14

Editor Information

  1. 3

    PRBO Conservation Science, 3820 Cypress Dr #11, Petaluma, CA 94954, USA

  2. 4

    School of Plant Biology, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 2006, Australia

  3. 5

    USDA Forest Service, Alaska Region, 3301 C Street, Anchorage, AK 99504, USA

  4. 6

    USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Region, Lakewood, CO 80401, USA

  5. 7

    USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Region, Vallejo, CA 94592, USA

  6. 8

    Department of Environmental Science and Policy, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA

  7. 9

    USDA Forest Service, National Office Washington, DC, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    USDA Forest Service, Northern Region, 200 East Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802, USA

  2. 2

    USDA Forest Service, Eastern Region, 626 East Wisconsin Avenue, Milwaukee, WI 53203, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 8 JUL 2012
  2. Published Print: 10 AUG 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781444337921

Online ISBN: 9781118329726

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Keywords:

  • historical ecology, informing wildlife conservation, restoration;
  • wildlife responses to ecosystem, life-history traits and environment;
  • HRV in restoration/management objectives, in climate change;
  • mountain yellow-legged, Rana muscosa and R. sierra, and introduced trout;
  • mountain yellow-legged frog in pond size/geography, contracted;
  • wood stork reproductive success and timing/spatial in foraging;
  • Everglades' wood stork dynamics, hydrology and wood stork productivity;
  • species response to climate shifts in the past, underscoring need for resiliency;
  • management crafted without insights from the past, a narrow perspective

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction

  • Case Studies

  • Conclusion

  • References