18. Ecological History Guides the Future of Conservation: Lessons from Africa

  1. John A. Wiens2,3,
  2. Gregory D. Hayward4,5,
  3. Hugh D. Safford6,7 and
  4. Catherine M. Giffen8
  1. A. R. E. Sinclair

Published Online: 8 JUL 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781118329726.ch18

Historical Environmental Variation in Conservation and Natural Resource Management

Historical Environmental Variation in Conservation and Natural Resource Management

How to Cite

Sinclair, A. R. E. (2012) Ecological History Guides the Future of Conservation: Lessons from Africa, in Historical Environmental Variation in Conservation and Natural Resource Management (eds J. A. Wiens, G. D. Hayward, H. D. Safford and C. M. Giffen), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118329726.ch18

Editor Information

  1. 2

    PRBO Conservation Science, 3820 Cypress Dr #11, Petaluma, CA 94954, USA

  2. 3

    School of Plant Biology, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 2006, Australia

  3. 4

    USDA Forest Service, Alaska Region, 3301 C Street, Anchorage, AK 99504, USA

  4. 5

    USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Region, Lakewood, CO 80401, USA

  5. 6

    USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Region, Vallejo, CA 94592, USA

  6. 7

    Department of Environmental Science and Policy, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA

  7. 8

    USDA Forest Service, National Office Washington, DC, USA

Author Information

  1. Beatty Biodiversity Centre, 6270 University Boulevard, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z4

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 8 JUL 2012
  2. Published Print: 10 AUG 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781444337921

Online ISBN: 9781118329726

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Keywords:

  • global perspectives;
  • ecological history in guiding future of conservation, lessons from Africa;
  • wildlife of savannah Africa and culling of African elephants;
  • wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus), and African buffalo in Serengeti Park;
  • Rinderpest, viral disease of cattle, introduced into Ethiopia from cattle;
  • ruminants and rinderpest, in species closely related to cattle;
  • Lorian swamp of northeast Kenya, elephants, with collapse of ivory trade;
  • Serengeti plains paleoecology, changing with shifts in climatic conditions;
  • current conservation paradigm for protected areas, legal boundary, inviolate;
  • human-nature conflicts, forcing setting aside of ‘contingency reserves’

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction

  • The Great Rinderpest

  • The Ivory Trade

  • Paleoecology of the Serengeti Plains

  • The New Conservation Paradigm: Contingency Reserves

  • References