19. Ecological History has Present and Future Ecological Consequences – Case Studies from Australia

  1. John A. Wiens2,3,
  2. Gregory D. Hayward4,5,
  3. Hugh D. Safford6,7 and
  4. Catherine M. Giffen8
  1. David Lindenmayer

Published Online: 8 JUL 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781118329726.ch19

Historical Environmental Variation in Conservation and Natural Resource Management

Historical Environmental Variation in Conservation and Natural Resource Management

How to Cite

Lindenmayer, D. (2012) Ecological History has Present and Future Ecological Consequences – Case Studies from Australia, in Historical Environmental Variation in Conservation and Natural Resource Management (eds J. A. Wiens, G. D. Hayward, H. D. Safford and C. M. Giffen), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118329726.ch19

Editor Information

  1. 2

    PRBO Conservation Science, 3820 Cypress Dr #11, Petaluma, CA 94954, USA

  2. 3

    School of Plant Biology, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 2006, Australia

  3. 4

    USDA Forest Service, Alaska Region, 3301 C Street, Anchorage, AK 99504, USA

  4. 5

    USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Region, Lakewood, CO 80401, USA

  5. 6

    USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Region, Vallejo, CA 94592, USA

  6. 7

    Department of Environmental Science and Policy, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA

  7. 8

    USDA Forest Service, National Office Washington, DC, USA

Author Information

  1. Fenner School of Environment and Society, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, 0200, Australia

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 8 JUL 2012
  2. Published Print: 10 AUG 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781444337921

Online ISBN: 9781118329726

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Keywords:

  • ecological history, present and future consequences, case studies from Australia;
  • wet ash forests of the Central Highlands of Victoria, southeastern Australia;
  • wildfire, logging and biodiversity, interlinked through ecological history;
  • montane ash forests, and natural disturbance regimes;
  • wildfires, stand-replacing or partial in montane, leaving biological legacies;
  • stands, and highest species richness of arboreal marsupials;
  • ecological history and post-disturbance forest management;
  • clear-cutting and postfire salvage, spatial distribution and biological legacies;
  • Booderee National Park, Jervis Bay Territory, fire, as key ecological process;
  • fire management and biodiversity conservation, critical for Booderee National Park

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • Introduction

  • Case Study #1 - The Wet Ash Forests of Victoria, Southeastern Australia

  • Case Study #2 - Booderee National Park, Jervis Bay Territory, Southeastern Australia

  • Concluding Comments

  • Acknowledgments

  • References