10. An Appraisal of the Bilingual Language Production System: Quantitatively or Qualitatively Different from Monolinguals?

  1. Tej K. Bhatia and
  2. William C. Ritchie
  1. Elin Runnqvist1,
  2. Ian Fitzpatrick2,
  3. Kristof Strijkers3 and
  4. Albert Costa4

Published Online: 3 OCT 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781118332382.ch10

The Handbook of Bilingualism and Multilingualism, Second Edition

The Handbook of Bilingualism and Multilingualism, Second Edition

How to Cite

Runnqvist, E., Fitzpatrick, I., Strijkers, K. and Costa, A. (2012) An Appraisal of the Bilingual Language Production System: Quantitatively or Qualitatively Different from Monolinguals?, in The Handbook of Bilingualism and Multilingualism, Second Edition (eds T. K. Bhatia and W. C. Ritchie), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118332382.ch10

Editor Information

  1. Syracuse University, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Universitat de Barcelona, Spain

  2. 2

    Heinrich Heine University, Düsseldorf, Germany

  3. 3

    CNRS-Laboratoire de Psychologie Cognitive, Université de Aix-Marseille, France

  4. 4

    ICREA-Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 3 OCT 2012
  2. Published Print: 7 NOV 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781444334906

Online ISBN: 9781118332382

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Keywords:

  • bilingual disadvantage;
  • bilingual language production;
  • bilingual speech production;
  • monolingual speech production;
  • post-lexical processing;
  • pre-lexical processing;
  • word production

Summary

This chapter delves deep into purported processing differences between monolinguals and bilinguals and attempts to ascertain whether they constitute qualitative and/or quantitative changes in the language production system. Lexical processing is probably the stage to which most differences have been attributed between mono- and bilingual speech production. At present, it seems to be clear that even when tested in their dominant language, bilinguals have a less robust and slower lexical access relative to monolinguals; a bilingual disadvantage that has been found repeatedly in a variety of tasks. At the lexical level, bilinguals appear to store words related to the same concept separately for each language. As a consequence, quantitative differences between a bilingual and a monolingual are expected during lexical retrieval.