14. Sign Language–Spoken Language Bilingualism and the Derivation of Bimodally Mixed Sentences

  1. Tej K. Bhatia and
  2. William C. Ritchie
  1. Gerald P. Berent

Published Online: 3 OCT 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781118332382.ch14

The Handbook of Bilingualism and Multilingualism, Second Edition

The Handbook of Bilingualism and Multilingualism, Second Edition

How to Cite

Berent, G. P. (2012) Sign Language–Spoken Language Bilingualism and the Derivation of Bimodally Mixed Sentences, in The Handbook of Bilingualism and Multilingualism, Second Edition (eds T. K. Bhatia and W. C. Ritchie), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118332382.ch14

Editor Information

  1. Syracuse University, USA

Author Information

  1. National Technical Institute for the Deaf, Rochester Institute of Technology, New York, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 3 OCT 2012
  2. Published Print: 7 NOV 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781444334906

Online ISBN: 9781118332382

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Keywords:

  • bimodal bilingualism;
  • bimodal code-switching (BCS);
  • bimodal mixing;
  • sign language;
  • spoken language

Summary

Sign language-spoken language bilingualism, or bimodal bilingualism, is the knowledge of a spoken language, communicated through the oral-aural modality, and a sign language, communicated through the visual-gestural modality. This chapter reviews the diverse products of sign language-spoken language interaction and sets the stage for a minimalist program of linguistic research on bimodal bilingual mixing, adopting a minimalist assumption for bimodal code-switching (BCS). Specifically, this chapter extends MacSwan's minimalist research program for unimodal bilingual mixing to the investigation of bimodal mixing. The interaction of not only two languages but also their two modalities yields bimodal linguistic structure with quite extraordinary properties when compared with unimodal mixing. Along with seeking a principled account of bimodal mixing, the ultimate goal of this review is to move toward an increased understanding of all bilingual mixing, both unimodal and bimodal.