3. Bilingual Aphasia: Theoretical and Clinical Considerations

  1. Tej K. Bhatia and
  2. William C. Ritchie
  1. Elizabeth Ijalba1,
  2. Loraine K. Obler2 and
  3. Shyamala Chengappa3

Published Online: 3 OCT 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781118332382.ch3

The Handbook of Bilingualism and Multilingualism, Second Edition

The Handbook of Bilingualism and Multilingualism, Second Edition

How to Cite

Ijalba, E., Obler, L. K. and Chengappa, S. (2012) Bilingual Aphasia: Theoretical and Clinical Considerations, in The Handbook of Bilingualism and Multilingualism, Second Edition (eds T. K. Bhatia and W. C. Ritchie), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118332382.ch3

Editor Information

  1. Syracuse University, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Queens College, CUNY, USA

  2. 2

    City University of New York Graduate Center, USA

  3. 3

    All India Institute of Speech and Hearing, Mysore, India

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 3 OCT 2012
  2. Published Print: 7 NOV 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781444334906

Online ISBN: 9781118332382

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Keywords:

  • bilingual aphasia;
  • declarative/procedural model;
  • hierarchical models;
  • inhibitory control model;
  • language breakdown;
  • language-switching;
  • memory systems;
  • polyglots

Summary

This chapter considers the discussion of language breakdown in polyglots, which has its roots in nineteenth-century Europe and spans across the globe in the twenty-first century. It discusses the questions that have been addressed and explores two models that focus on different but complementary aspects. One model emphasizes different memory systems that influence language processing in bilinguals, while the other model focuses on executive control of language functions. The chapter briefly reviews hierarchical models and considers recent investigations focused on cross-linguistic clinical findings, such as transfer and interference among languages. This structure permits the discussion of the literature on clinical cases of bilingual aphasia, focusing on the phenomenology of disorders seen in them, including language-switching, translation disorders, and order of language return during recovery from aphasia.