3. Corporate Reputation and the Discipline of Interpersonal Communication

  1. Craig E. Carroll PhD
  1. Sherry J. Holladay PhD

Published Online: 4 APR 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118335529.ch3

The Handbook of Communication and Corporate Reputation

The Handbook of Communication and Corporate Reputation

How to Cite

Holladay, S. J. (2013) Corporate Reputation and the Discipline of Interpersonal Communication, in The Handbook of Communication and Corporate Reputation (ed C. E. Carroll), Blackwell Publishing Ltd., Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118335529.ch3

Editor Information

  1. The University of Texas, Austin, USA

Author Information

  1. University of Central Florida, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 4 APR 2013
  2. Published Print: 3 JUN 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470670989

Online ISBN: 9781118335529

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Keywords:

  • corporate reputation;
  • impression management approach;
  • interpersonal communication (IC);
  • social cognition approach;
  • social exchange approach

Summary

Although interpersonal communication (IC) might seem like a somewhat unlikely contributor to the study of corporate reputation, the influence of interpersonal communication theories is evident in much of the language used to describe reputations. This chapter begins with a brief orientation to the origins of IC. Definitions of reputation are introduced to demonstrate how ideas from interpersonal communication are reflected in those definitions. Next, three major theoretical orientations in interpersonal communication namely social cognition, social exchange theory, and impression management are discussed as primary contributors to the study of reputation. The final section of the chapter identifies the limitations of applying interpersonal communication theory to the study of reputation.