14. Setting up a National Hemovigilance System: SHOT

  1. René R. P. De Vries MD3 and
  2. Jean-Claude Faber MD4
  1. Hannah Cohen MD, FRCP, FRPath1 and
  2. Lorna M. Williamson BSc, MD, FRCP, FRCPath2

Published Online: 6 AUG 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781118338179.ch14

Hemovigilance: An Effective Tool for Improving Transfusion Safety

Hemovigilance: An Effective Tool for Improving Transfusion Safety

How to Cite

Cohen, H. and Williamson, L. M. (2012) Setting up a National Hemovigilance System: SHOT, in Hemovigilance: An Effective Tool for Improving Transfusion Safety (eds R. R. P. De Vries and J.-C. Faber), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118338179.ch14

Editor Information

  1. 3

    Department of Immunohematology and Blood Transfusion, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands

  2. 4

    Blood Transfusion Service of the Luxembourg Red Cross, Luxembourg

Author Information

  1. 1

    University College London Hospitals and University College, London, Department of Haematology, London, UK

  2. 2

    NHS Blood and Transplant, Watford, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 6 AUG 2012
  2. Published Print: 29 AUG 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470655276

Online ISBN: 9781118338179

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Keywords:

  • setting up a national hemovigilance system, SHOT;
  • origins, of Serious Hazards of Transfusion (SHOT);
  • three key areas for running of SHOT;
  • additional SHOT reporting categories;
  • summary, main characteristics of SHOT scheme;
  • under/delayed transfusion;
  • SHOT, case analysis by imputability;
  • impact of EU Blood Directive on SHOT reporting;
  • SHOT, promoting international hemovigilance by collaborative working;
  • organogram, showing SHOT staffing structure

Summary

This chapter contains sections titled:

  • The origins of Serious Hazards of Transfusion (SHOT)

  • Getting SHOT started

  • Type of events to be reported

  • Governance

  • Infrastructure and budget

  • The launch of SHOT

  • What would we have done differently?

  • References