10. Field Studies

  1. Brian L. Strom MD, MPH2,
  2. Stephen E. Kimmel MD, MSCE3 and
  3. Sean Hennessy PharmD, PhD4
  1. David W. Kaufman

Published Online: 7 JUL 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118344828.ch10

Textbook of Pharmacoepidemiology

Textbook of Pharmacoepidemiology

How to Cite

Kaufman, D. W. (2013) Field Studies, in Textbook of Pharmacoepidemiology (eds B. L. Strom, S. E. Kimmel and S. Hennessy), John Wiley & Sons Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118344828.ch10

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Executive Vice Dean for Institutional Affairs, George S. Pepper Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Professor of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, of Medicine, and of Pharmacology, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Center for Pharmacoepidemiology Research and Training, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA

  2. 3

    Professor of Medicine and of Epidemiology, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Center for Pharmacoepidemiology Research and Training, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA

  3. 4

    Associate Professor of Epidemiology and of Pharmacology, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Center for Pharmacoepidemiology Research and Training Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA

Author Information

  1. Slone Epidemiology Center at Boston University and Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 7 JUL 2013
  2. Published Print: 16 SEP 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118344866

Online ISBN: 9781118344828

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Keywords:

  • data collection instruments;
  • database studies;
  • field studies;
  • information bias;
  • selection bias

Summary

All types of epidemiologic research designs, including cohort, case-control, and cross-sectional designs can be conducted as field studies, as long as subject enrollment and data collection are part of the process. Field studies are more expensive and slower than studies using existing data, but there are situations where a field study is the only way to recruit the subjects and/or obtain the information needed to answer specific research questions. Strengths and weaknesses of field studies are generally complementary to those of database studies. This chapter describes some of the practical aspects of field studies in the areas of design, setup, conduct, and analysis. There are two key goals in the enrollment phase of all field studies: to reach the targeted number of subjects meeting the inclusion criteria so as to meet the sample size requirements, and to maximize the participation rate in order to reduce the possibility of selection bias.