13. Depression and Multiple Sclerosis

  1. Andres M. Kanner MD4,5,6
  1. Dana J. Serafin BS1,
  2. Deborah M. Weisbrot MD2 and
  3. Alan B. Ettinger MD3

Published Online: 4 JUL 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781118348093.ch13

Depression in Neurologic Disorders: Diagnosis and Management

Depression in Neurologic Disorders: Diagnosis and Management

How to Cite

Serafin, D. J., Weisbrot, D. M. and Ettinger, A. B. (2012) Depression and Multiple Sclerosis, in Depression in Neurologic Disorders: Diagnosis and Management (ed A. M. Kanner), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118348093.ch13

Editor Information

  1. 4

    Departments of Neurological Sciences and Psychiatry, Rush Medical College at Rush University, Chicago, IL, USA

  2. 5

    Laboratory of EEG and Video-EEG-Telemetry, Chicago, IL, USA

  3. 6

    Section of Epilepsy and Rush Epilepsy Center, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Neurology, Stony Brook University Medical Center, Stony Brook, NY, USA

  2. 2

    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stony Brook University Medical Center, Stony Brook, NY, USA

  3. 3

    Neurological Surgery P.C., Lake Success, NY, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 4 JUL 2012
  2. Published Print: 24 AUG 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781444330588

Online ISBN: 9781118348093

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • multiple sclerosis;
  • depression;
  • etiology;
  • suicide;
  • fatigue;
  • cognition;
  • assessment;
  • treatment

Summary

Individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) suffer from depression at rates that are much higher than those of healthy individuals and even those with other neurologic conditions. Nonetheless, depression in MS is often underrecognized and undertreated. Recent research has revealed that depression in MS is associated with specific immunopathological alterations and brain changes seen using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Individuals with MS have significantly higher rates of suicide than are found in the general population. Depression is a highly treatable condition, and it is essential for the clinician to be alert to the possibility of its occurrence in patients with MS. Patients with symptoms of depression should be referred for immediate psychiatric evaluation.