4. Screening Instruments for Depression in Neurologic Disorders: Their Application in the Clinic and in Research

  1. Andres M. Kanner MD2,3,4
  1. Andres M. Kanner MD2,3,4 and
  2. Angela Strobel Parsons1

Published Online: 4 JUL 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781118348093.ch4

Depression in Neurologic Disorders: Diagnosis and Management

Depression in Neurologic Disorders: Diagnosis and Management

How to Cite

Kanner, A. M. and Strobel Parsons, A. (2012) Screening Instruments for Depression in Neurologic Disorders: Their Application in the Clinic and in Research, in Depression in Neurologic Disorders: Diagnosis and Management (ed A. M. Kanner), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118348093.ch4

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Departments of Neurological Sciences and Psychiatry, Rush Medical College at Rush University, Chicago, IL, USA

  2. 3

    Laboratory of EEG and Video-EEG-Telemetry, Chicago, IL, USA

  3. 4

    Section of Epilepsy and Rush Epilepsy Center, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Chicago College of Osteopathic Medicine, Midwestern University, Downers Grove, IL, USA

  2. 2

    Departments of Neurological Sciences and Psychiatry, Rush Medical College at Rush University, Chicago, IL, USA

  3. 3

    Laboratory of EEG and Video-EEG-Telemetry, Chicago, IL, USA

  4. 4

    Section of Epilepsy and Rush Epilepsy Center, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 4 JUL 2012
  2. Published Print: 24 AUG 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781444330588

Online ISBN: 9781118348093

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Keywords:

  • major depressive disorder;
  • poststroke depression;
  • interictal dysphoric disorder;
  • Beck Depression Inventory;
  • Hospital Anxiety and Depression Screening;
  • stroke;
  • epilepsy;
  • Parkinson's disease;
  • Alzheimer's dementia

Summary

Depressive disorders (DDs) are relatively common in most major neurologic disorders, including epilepsy, stroke, dementias, Parkinson's disease, and multiple sclerosis. These DDs have a negative impact on the course and response to therapy of the neurologic disorder. Yet, DDs remain underrecognized and undertreated. The use of screening instruments can help overcome this major problem. However, caution must be exerted in the interpretation of instruments developed for primary DDs, as several somatic and cognitive symptoms that are common in primary DDs may be the expression of symptoms of the neurologic disorder or of adverse events of pharmacotherapy. Furthermore, DDs associated with some neurologic disorders may differ in their semiology. Thus, it is desirable to have depression scales validated for each neurologic disorder. Fortunately, most instruments appear to yield comparable acceptable sensitivities and specificities.