6. Neuropsychological Aspects of Depression: Their Relevance in Depression in Neurologic Disorders

  1. Andres M. Kanner MD3,4,5
  1. Erica J. Kalkut PhD1 and
  2. Christopher L. Grote PhD2

Published Online: 4 JUL 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781118348093.ch6

Depression in Neurologic Disorders: Diagnosis and Management

Depression in Neurologic Disorders: Diagnosis and Management

How to Cite

Kalkut, E. J. and Grote, C. L. (2012) Neuropsychological Aspects of Depression: Their Relevance in Depression in Neurologic Disorders, in Depression in Neurologic Disorders: Diagnosis and Management (ed A. M. Kanner), Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118348093.ch6

Editor Information

  1. 3

    Departments of Neurological Sciences and Psychiatry, Rush Medical College at Rush University, Chicago, IL, USA

  2. 4

    Laboratory of EEG and Video-EEG-Telemetry, Chicago, IL, USA

  3. 5

    Section of Epilepsy and Rush Epilepsy Center, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Neurology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USA

  2. 2

    Department of Behavioral Sciences, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 4 JUL 2012
  2. Published Print: 24 AUG 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781444330588

Online ISBN: 9781118348093

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Keywords:

  • depression: neuropsychological;
  • deficits;
  • executive functioning;
  • frontal systems

Summary

Researchers and clinicians increasingly understand that depression is both a cause and effect of neurologic illness. In anticipating and recognizing this bidirectional relationship, health-care professionals can better help their patients and avoid diagnostic “traps” such as trying to determine if a patient's cognitive deficits can be explained solely by “organic” or “functional” factors. This chapter reviews relevant literature, including the finding that depressed patients are apt to show a variety of cognitive deficits, but perhaps none more so than those measuring executive function and other “frontal system” abilities. The chapter concludes with two case examples that illustrate the essential interplay of alterations in mood and cognition.