26. Plant Materials for Novel Ecosystems

  1. Richard J. Hobbs2,
  2. Eric S. Higgs3 and
  3. Carol M. Hall3
  1. Thomas A. Jones

Published Online: 31 JAN 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118354186.ch26

Novel Ecosystems: Intervening in the New Ecological World Order

Novel Ecosystems: Intervening in the New Ecological World Order

How to Cite

Jones, T. A. (2013) Plant Materials for Novel Ecosystems, in Novel Ecosystems: Intervening in the New Ecological World Order (eds R. J. Hobbs, E. S. Higgs and C. M. Hall), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118354186.ch26

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Ecosystem Restoration and Intervention Ecology (ERIE) Research Group, School of Plant Biology, University of Western Australia, Australia

  2. 3

    School of Environmental Studies, University of Victoria, Canada

Author Information

  1. USDA Agricultural Research Service, Logan, Utah, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 31 JAN 2013
  2. Published Print: 19 FEB 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118354223

Online ISBN: 9781118354186

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Keywords:

  • ecosystem services;
  • evolution;
  • genetic variation;
  • interventionist approach;
  • novel ecosystems;
  • plant materials;
  • preservationist approach

Summary

This chapter discusses the role of restoration plant materials in novel ecosystems. The commonly held preservationist approach to restoration plant materials has locally adapted population as its centerpiece and is rooted in conservation biology tradition. The preservationist approach to restoration plant materials emphasizes taxonomic and genetic patterns and is predictably widely supported by biological disciplines that emphasize ‘patterns’, such as systematists and population biologists. The debate between the preservationist and interventionist approaches could be succinctly summarized as ecosystem ‘patterns versus processes’. Presenting the ecological, evolutionary and genetic, and practical issues related to preservationist approach for novel ecosystems, the chapter also discusses the objectives for plant materials for novel ecosystems. It finally talks about the development of plant materials for ecosystems, focusing on the topics of contemporary evolution and assisted evolution, augmenting genetic variation, artificial selection, and release and environmental evaluation.