30. Engaging the Public in Novel Ecosystems

  1. Richard J. Hobbs6,
  2. Eric S. Higgs7 and
  3. Carol M. Hall7
  1. Laurie Yung1,
  2. Steve Schwarze2,
  3. Wylie Carr3,
  4. F. Stuart Chapin III4 and
  5. Emma Marris5

Published Online: 31 JAN 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118354186.ch30

Novel Ecosystems: Intervening in the New Ecological World Order

Novel Ecosystems: Intervening in the New Ecological World Order

How to Cite

Yung, L., Schwarze, S., Carr, W., Chapin, F. S. and Marris, E. (2013) Engaging the Public in Novel Ecosystems, in Novel Ecosystems: Intervening in the New Ecological World Order (eds R. J. Hobbs, E. S. Higgs and C. M. Hall), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118354186.ch30

Editor Information

  1. 6

    Ecosystem Restoration and Intervention Ecology (ERIE) Research Group, School of Plant Biology, University of Western Australia, Australia

  2. 7

    School of Environmental Studies, University of Victoria, Canada

Author Information

  1. 1

    Resource Conservation Program, College of Forestry and Conservation, University of Montana, USA

  2. 2

    Communication Studies, University of Montana, USA

  3. 3

    Society and Conservation, University of Montana, USA

  4. 4

    Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, USA

  5. 5

    Columbia, Missouri, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 31 JAN 2013
  2. Published Print: 19 FEB 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118354223

Online ISBN: 9781118354186

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Keywords:

  • communication;
  • ecosystem management;
  • novel ecosystems;
  • policy decisions;
  • public engagement

Summary

Novel ecosystems are fundamentally social and ecological. This chapter discusses the role of public engagement in novel ecosystems and suggests strategies for facilitating this broader public dialogue. It examines strategies and methods for communicating about the novel ecosystems concept and for engaging the public in thinking about and planning for such places. Effective communication and engagement require involvement of scientists to ensure dialogue with scientific knowledge) and decision-makers (to ensure that public views influence policy-making) as well as professional facilitators, communication experts and other specialists. Most importantly, a diversity of stakeholders representing different values, interests and ideologies need to be included in such efforts. Communication about novel ecosystems should be less about abstract scientific concepts and more about local, on-the-ground changes. The goal of effective communication should be to engage people in a broad public dialogue that informs policy decisions.