33. The Policy Context: Building Laws and Rules that Embrace Novelty

  1. Richard J. Hobbs3,
  2. Eric S. Higgs4 and
  3. Carol M. Hall4
  1. Peter Bridgewater1 and
  2. Laurie Yung2

Published Online: 31 JAN 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118354186.ch33

Novel Ecosystems: Intervening in the New Ecological World Order

Novel Ecosystems: Intervening in the New Ecological World Order

How to Cite

Bridgewater, P. and Yung, L. (2013) The Policy Context: Building Laws and Rules that Embrace Novelty, in Novel Ecosystems: Intervening in the New Ecological World Order (eds R. J. Hobbs, E. S. Higgs and C. M. Hall), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118354186.ch33

Editor Information

  1. 3

    Ecosystem Restoration and Intervention Ecology (ERIE) Research Group, School of Plant Biology, University of Western Australia, Australia

  2. 4

    School of Environmental Studies, University of Victoria, Canada

Author Information

  1. 1

    Global Garden Consulting, UK

  2. 2

    Resource Conservation Program, College of Forestry and Conservation, University of Montana, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 31 JAN 2013
  2. Published Print: 19 FEB 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118354223

Online ISBN: 9781118354186

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Keywords:

  • biodiversity;
  • international biodiversity policy;
  • national biodiversity policies;
  • novel ecosystem change

Summary

This chapter examines how novelty and novel ecosystem changes are addressed in existing domestic and international policy. It also examines what types of changes might improve policy guidance. The chapter considers a range of policies related to biodiversity and endangered species, invasive species, protected areas and ecosystem services. In addition to international examples, it looks at domestic policy from the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada and Australia. The chapter argues that significant gaps remain and outdated policy and legislative frameworks continue to limit our ability to respond to the challenges and opportunities posed by the emergence of novel ecosystems. It also highlights some key areas of innovation and some policy space to address novelty. Wherever possible, the chapter suggests how policy might be amended and improved to both acknowledge the existence of novel ecosystems and provide mechanisms for management (and even conservation) of such systems.