37. Concerns about Novel Ecosystems

  1. Richard J. Hobbs3,
  2. Eric S. Higgs4 and
  3. Carol M. Hall4
  1. Rachel J. Standish3,
  2. Allen Thompson1,
  3. Eric S. Higgs4 and
  4. Stephen D. Murphy2

Published Online: 31 JAN 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118354186.ch37

Novel Ecosystems: Intervening in the New Ecological World Order

Novel Ecosystems: Intervening in the New Ecological World Order

How to Cite

Standish, R. J., Thompson, A., Higgs, E. S. and Murphy, S. D. (2013) Concerns about Novel Ecosystems, in Novel Ecosystems: Intervening in the New Ecological World Order (eds R. J. Hobbs, E. S. Higgs and C. M. Hall), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118354186.ch37

Editor Information

  1. 3

    Ecosystem Restoration and Intervention Ecology (ERIE) Research Group, School of Plant Biology, University of Western Australia, Australia

  2. 4

    School of Environmental Studies, University of Victoria, Canada

Author Information

  1. 1

    School of History, Philosophy, and Religion, Oregon State University, USA

  2. 2

    Department of Environment and Resource Studies, University of Waterloo, Canada

  3. 3

    Ecosystem Restoration and Intervention Ecology (ERIE) Research Group, School of Plant Biology, University of Western Australia, Australia

  4. 4

    School of Environmental Studies, University of Victoria, Canada

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 31 JAN 2013
  2. Published Print: 19 FEB 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118354223

Online ISBN: 9781118354186

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Keywords:

  • conservation;
  • ecosystem management;
  • invasive species;
  • novel ecosystems

Summary

This chapter focuses on two types of concerns about novel ecosystems. The first concern is connected with misapprehensions that arise, mostly from lack of information or misunderstanding of the implications of managing novel ecosystems. These concerns should not be ignored or underestimated because they can easily obstruct an informed and constructive discussion about novel ecosystems and their management. The first misapprehension is that accepting or acknowledging novel ecosystems implies that managers will surrender any attempt to control invasive species. The second misapprehension addressed here is that acceptance of novel ecosystems will result in the replacement of traditional conservation and restoration practice. The second type of concern includes more persistent concerns about novel ecosystems. These are much more difficult concerns to work through because they require revisiting and possibly altering systemic patterns of social tradition and moral beliefs that pertain to nature and its conservation.