5. Origins of the Novel Ecosystems Concept

  1. Richard J. Hobbs6,
  2. Eric S. Higgs7 and
  3. Carol M. Hall7
  1. Joseph Mascaro1,
  2. James A. Harris2,
  3. Lori Lach6,
  4. Allen Thompson3,
  5. Michael P. Perring6,
  6. David M. Richardson4 and
  7. Erle C. Ellis5

Published Online: 31 JAN 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118354186.ch5

Novel Ecosystems: Intervening in the New Ecological World Order

Novel Ecosystems: Intervening in the New Ecological World Order

How to Cite

Mascaro, J., Harris, J. A., Lach, L., Thompson, A., Perring, M. P., Richardson, D. M. and Ellis, E. C. (2013) Origins of the Novel Ecosystems Concept, in Novel Ecosystems: Intervening in the New Ecological World Order (eds R. J. Hobbs, E. S. Higgs and C. M. Hall), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118354186.ch5

Editor Information

  1. 6

    Ecosystem Restoration and Intervention Ecology (ERIE) Research Group, School of Plant Biology, University of Western Australia, Australia

  2. 7

    School of Environmental Studies, University of Victoria, Canada

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, California, USA

  2. 2

    Environmental Science and Technology Department, Cranfield University, UK

  3. 3

    School of History, Philosophy, and Religion, Oregon State University, USA

  4. 4

    Centre for Invasion Biology, Department of Botany and Zoology, Stellenbosch University, South Africa

  5. 5

    Geography & Environmental Systems, University of Maryland, USA

  6. 6

    Ecosystem Restoration and Intervention Ecology (ERIE) Research Group, School of Plant Biology, University of Western Australia, Australia

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 31 JAN 2013
  2. Published Print: 19 FEB 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118354223

Online ISBN: 9781118354186

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Keywords:

  • human intervention;
  • novel ecosystems;
  • novel ecosystems framework

Summary

This chapter begins by reviewing the foundational principles that point to the existence and importance of novel ecosystems. It provides a brief review of previous formulations of the novel ecosystem concept. The chapter then steps into synthesis and presents a new framework for the novel ecosystems concept. Using the original Hobbs components of novelty and human agency as a starting point, it develops this synthesis by first considering (1) where and how human agency leads to novelty; (2) what level of novelty constitutes a novel ecosystem; and (3) how human agency acts after a novel ecosystem has emerged. Conceptual examples of the emergence of novel ecosystems in Puerto Rico and California are illustrated.