22. Porous nanomaterials for biomedical applications

  1. Tomás Torres1 and
  2. Giovanni Bottari2
  1. Henning Lülf,
  2. André Devaux,
  3. Eko Adi Prasetyanto and
  4. Luisa De Cola

Published Online: 16 AUG 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118354377.ch22

Organic Nanomaterials: Synthesis, Characterization, and Device Applications

Organic Nanomaterials: Synthesis, Characterization, and Device Applications

How to Cite

Lülf, H., Devaux, A., Prasetyanto, E. A. and Cola, L. D. (2013) Porous nanomaterials for biomedical applications, in Organic Nanomaterials: Synthesis, Characterization, and Device Applications (eds T. Torres and G. Bottari), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9781118354377.ch22

Editor Information

  1. 1

    Departamento de Química Orgánica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid, Spain and IMDEA Nanociencia, C/Faraday 9, Ciudad Universitaria de Canto Blanco, Madrid, Spain

  2. 2

    Departamento de Química Orgánica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid, Spain and IMDEA Nanociencia, C/Faraday 9, Ciudad Universitaria de Canto Blanco, Madrid, Spain

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 16 AUG 2013
  2. Published Print: 16 AUG 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118016015

Online ISBN: 9781118354377

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Keywords:

  • biomedical applications;
  • drug delivery;
  • imaging;
  • mesoporous silicates;
  • microporous zeolites

Summary

This chapter focuses on mesoporous silicates and classical zeolites featuring micropores as hostmaterials. Despite the obvious differences between the two classes of porous materials, one can find many analogies and similarities. The chapter describes the biomedical applications of these materials, and deals with the functionalization of porous systems with biocompatible molecules. It discusses the interactions with bacteria and cells, along with their in vivo applications and explains the use for cell growth. The creation of biocompatible nanocontainers leads to important uses of them such as imaging, drug delivery, and combination of diagnostic and therapy (theranostics).